The Five Famous Foods of Enid Blyton that I want to eat

Book Thoughts, children's books, picture books, Uncategorized

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“You can’t have adventures on an empty stomach,” reasoned Dick.

Enid Blyton is the queen of fictional food. I set out to write a post about the four fictional feasts I would love to eat, but quickly realised that everything that I was writing about was from Enid. Why does she love food so much? How does she make it sound so magical? I just don’t know. But here are the things that stick in my mind as the foods I’d share with my small, plucky crime fighting gang.

Three reasons DK’s Peekaboo! Bedtime is Kezia’s new favourite book

children's books, picture books, Uncategorized

 

Big bunny is trying to get everyone to bed but he can’t find any of his friends! Happily Cuddly Ted, Miss Elephant,  Mr Owl and Fluffy Chick pop up in very unlikely places, and everyone can get ready to go to sleep – or will they?

Kezia was given this book a couple of weeks ago – and we LOVE it! She’s almost five months old now and it turns out that is plenty old enough to enjoy this story and to grab for the pop-up bits. Here’s three things we love about the book:

Fairies, photography, ghosts, woods and a heart transplant. Yep, that’s In Darkling Wood by Emma Carroll

Book Reviews, children's books, Writing


When a heart transplant is suddenly availiable for her younger brother Theo, Alice is packed off to stay with her mysterious grandmother in her house in the middle of the woods. Her grandmother is determined to cut it down – but no one else wants her to; including, Alice’s new friend Flo says, the fairies. But can the fairies possibly be real? And why is it that Flo doesn’t seem to go to school? And will Theo be okay? And what secrets are hidden in the house?

Not until coming to write this did I realise how many plots are packed into this short book! In many ways it’s a Tom’s Midnight Garden story; weaving the past and present, magic and mystery all together to tell a tale. And it does it really well; presenting modernity and the past with subtlety and intrigue.

The Graveyard Book – Neil Gaiman

Book Reviews, Book Thoughts, Recommended

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When a mysterious stranger kills a one-year-old boy’s family he wants to finish the job, but the adventurous boy wanders into the graveyard, where he is protected by ghosts. They decide to adopt him, name him Nobody or Bod for short, and bring him up. Through encounters with ghosts and ghouls, mysterious beings and even the real human world he learns everything he needs to know for when the killer comes back to finish the job.

This is a kids book – and it was great! It’s well put together, thought through, intriguing and satisfying from start to finish. A very well formed growing-up story, with interesting characters and events and the safe-spooky feel of Tim Burton.