Another romp in the Third Reich – Hitler’s niece adventures again in Blankman’s Conspiracy of Blood and Smoke

Book Reviews, Book Thoughts, teen book reviews

After the gruelling and dramatic adventures escaping from Nazi Germany under her adopted uncle Hitler’s nose with her Jewish boyfriend Daniel in book one, Gretchen has been taken in by an English family and for the first time ever has a place she likes to call home. But Daniel isn’t so well placed – and when he hears his brother is ill he rushes back to Germany. Next thing Gretchen hears he’s accused of murder – and she makes the dangerous journey to Berlin in an attempt to clear his name, encountering gangs, the SS, secrets and old Nazi acquaintances galore as she tries to pull one over on Hitler yet again.

I was initially doubtful about how another book could come out of this. Gretchen escaped from terrible circumstances and crazy happenings – and now she’s going back! What! And once she was back in Germany, the drama came thick and fast. The coincidences were far too many, the story completely implausible – but terrific fun. It’s pushing beyond the limits of believability, but if you accept that, it’s gripping and exciting.

Real Teen Reviews – OH MY DAYS IT’S SOOO TENSE – Anne Blankman’s Prisoner of Night and Fog

Book Reviews, Book Thoughts, Recommended, teen book reviews

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In Real Teen Reviews I interview my 15-year-old marvel of a sister about books that I’ve made her read. This story of Hitler’s fictional niece who defies Nazi-ism is the second one and I’m pleased to say she’s enjoying the process so far! For my thoughts and a summary of Prisoner of Night and Fog go to my original post here.

My first feedback came in the form of seeing her disappear into the book for a few hours, then two days later by text.

Hitler’s fictional niece’s compelling story – well-placed historical wondering in Anne Blankman’s Prisoner of Night and Fog.

Book Reviews, Book Thoughts, Recommended, teen book reviews, Uncategorized

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Gretchen’s father sacrificed himself to save Hitler, and so her family has lived in his favour ever since. But when a stranger questions her father’s death everything Gretchen believes is turned upside down and she is determined to find the truth. Helped by the strangely kind Jew Daniel her quest, hindered by her distant and strange brother and her changing relationship with Hitler and the powerful National Socialist party, leads her to bold and subversive ideas that change her life forever.

Will we ever tire of stories of the wars and of Hitler? I don’t know – but I certainly haven’t. Set in Munich as Hitler’s power rises, Gretchen’s position as an honorary-niece gives a unique perspective of his personality and the tensions of Germany in the period. But really it is Gretchen and her story that is the focus; and this is fascinating in itself. Add in the ever-popular topic of the beginnings of psychoanalysis and you’ve got a winner!